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By Edmund P. Cueva, Shannon N. Byrne

This better half addresses a subject matter of continuous modern relevance, either cultural and literary.

  • Offers either a wide-ranging exploration of the classical novel of antiquity and a wealth of shut literary analysis
  • Brings jointly the main updated overseas scholarship at the old novel, together with clean new educational voices
  • Includes concentrated chapters on person classical authors, similar to Petronius, Xenophon and Apuleius, in addition to a wide-ranging thematic analysis
  • Addresses difficult questions pertaining to authorial expression and readership of the traditional novel form
  • Provides an finished creation to a style with a emerging profile

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A Companion to the Ancient Novel

This better half addresses a subject of continuous modern relevance, either cultural and literary. bargains either a wide-ranging exploration of the classical novel of antiquity and a wealth of shut literary analysisBrings jointly the main updated overseas scholarship at the historical novel, together with clean new educational voicesIncludes targeted chapters on person classical authors, comparable to Petronius, Xenophon and Apuleius, in addition to a wide-ranging thematic analysisAddresses complicated questions relating authorial expression and readership of the traditional novel formProvides an comprehensive advent to a style with a emerging profile

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Extra info for A Companion to the Ancient Novel

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Knox. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 683–699. L. 1994. ” In The Search for the Ancient Novel, edited by J. Tatum. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, pp. 435–459. P. 2004. The Myths of Fiction: Studies in the Canonic Greek Novels. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Egger, B. 1994a. R. Morgan and Richard Stoneman. London: Routledge, pp. 31–48. T. 1986. Aphrodisias, City of Venus Aphrodite. London: Muller, Blond & White. Hägg, T. 1971. Narrative Technique in Ancient Greek Romances: Studies of Chariton, Xenophon Ephesius, and Achilles Tatius.

And Hermocrates’ defeat of the Athenians who beat the Persians, which no one could refute, lends credibility (of a kind) to any military and naval e­ scapades to rescue his daughter. The relationship to the other ideal novels has something to tell us. Often, it is tempting to bracket Chariton with Xenophon of Ephesus as “presophistic,” but the two are really poles apart in technique and spirit, and although both begin with marriage and end (almost) with the lovers reunited in bed, the key difference is that Xenophon appears as naive as his characters and cannot smile at anything or anyone.

He also presents Hermocrates at the end of Book 8, encouraging Chaereas to tell his story: he himself skips over the embarrassing beginning in short order, but dwells just long enough on events to remind the reader how it all began. 7), giving a distinctly “Syracusan” gloss on Dionysius’ marriage to Callirhoe: it was to preserve the life of a citizen of Syracuse (the child) that Callirhoe has allowed herself the feigned marriage to Dionysius. And, characteristically for the curious crowd, the Syracusans more than once interrupt the narrative so that Chaereas will be able to leave nothing out.

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